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NEW SCHOLARS: TOP TIPS FOR YOUR COLLEGE TRANSITION

After being welcomed into the Wentcher family, New Scholars were able to connect with Wentcher Alumni and get advice on various topics ahead of their first time on campus through four College Transition Workshops. The topics included getting involved on campus, navigating a college as a first generation student, finding and using academic resources, and what to expect from dorm life.

 

Below, we have compiled a list of tips to recap the sessions for those who may have missed the sessions and need some advice:

 

 

“Making Your Mark: Getting Involved on Campus” – July 7

  1. Getting involved on campus through joining clubs is a great way to meet people and make friends no matter if you’re a commuter or live on campus!
  2. The different clubs and organizations you join at your school look great on your resume, especially leadership roles you might take on in those clubs! Some clubs might even help you with networking opportunities to find internships and jobs post-graduation.

“You Belong: Learning College As A First-Generation Student” – July 13

  1. As a first-generation college student, you may find that your parents don’t understand your busy schedule which may prevent you from calling home and visiting often. A little bit of communication goes a long way! When communicating, be kind and remember to keep in mind that your parents haven’t gone through this before.
  2. 4. Being a first-generation college student is a huge accomplishment that is recognized by a lot of people, so please do not be shy about indicating that you are a first-generation student when applying for additional funding or programs at your school. There is more help available than you think!

“Help is On the Way :Learning College As a First Generation Student” – July 19

  1.  Most colleges offer free mental health services to their students, so please don’t be afraid to utilize your school’s mental health services if you feel yourself struggling at any time during the school year. Please note that as Wentcher Scholars, we offer Perspectives in which you can receive free counseling on a variety of topics!
  2. Don’t be afraid to ask your professor for help, attend office hours, and take advantage of your school’s tutoring services if struggling in your classes. Please note that as a Wentcher Scholar you have Chegg services available for your stem courses should you need additional help!

“Dorm Life: What to Expect When You Move To Campus” – July 28

  1. Starting the school year off by creating a roommate agreement in which you and your roommate establish a cleaning schedule and ground rules can be helpful in cutting down on roommate conflict in the future.
  2. A good way to meet people that live in your dorm is through programs that your Resident Assistant may host for your floor or building. These events tend to have great food and fun activities!

Pro Tips for Packing for College

  1. When packing a suitcase for school, rolling clothes instead of folding them can save more space. If possible, buy large toiletry items once you get to campus to avoid a heavy suitcase. Lastly, for the first semester it is advisable to pack for the summer and fall, and when you return home for the holidays try to bring a partially empty suitcase, so you have enough room to grab your winter coat and apparel.
  2.  If you’re having trouble deciding what to bring or buy for your stay on campus, check out the supply list on Bed, Bath, and Beyond’s website!

Wentcher Scholars can request a zoom recording of each session.

 

We also want to extend our thanks to our Wentcher Scholar alumni and upperclassmen who led these great sessions including Madeline Mortell, Nnaemeka Nwankpa, Jessica Criollo, Andre Taylor, Stephany Baca, Nia Harris, and Xingxing Shou. 

 

Happy back to school season everyone!

Author: Nia Harris

Author: Nia Harris

Currently living in NYC, Nia Harris is a NYU graduate and Fulbright Scholar working for the Wentcher Foundation as the Program Associate. She writes for her own blog, Nashari which you can find here.

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